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Meat Free Monday

So the quest to use my neglected cookbooks to prove The Boyfriend wrong, wrong, so very wrong continues. If I can show him that actually I do very much use and value every single one of my lovely cookbooks, then the better chance I have at receiving more cookbooks from him when Christmas rolls around. Forward planning at its very best, I’m in this for the long haul. Using these cookbooks also means that I’ll be trying new and interesting foods that I might not have cooked otherwise, which seems more in the spirit of things than wishing for presents, I guess. But you know why I’m really doing it.

Feeling in the mood for something spicy but fairly healthy, I called upon Masterchef winner Thomasina Miers and her book Wahaca: Mexican Food at Home. Her first cookbook – Mexican Food Made Simple – is a favourite of mine and has seen plenty of kitchen action but the sequel has not been so lucky. I made the banana, chocolate and nut bread last year from it and then that was that. Considering how much I love Mexican food, its surprising that I’ve managed to neglect it so well. I’d like to stress that if you’re tempted to buy this book, don’t expect to find cheesy burritos, fajitas or chilli con carne because a Tex-Mex book this ain’t. Tex -Mex food is delicious without doubt and I’d never turn my nose up at it, but it definitely falls more into Tex cuisine than Mex. I’d imagine most Mexicans wouldn’t recognise a Taco Bell style burrito and certainly wouldn’t classify it as authentic Mexican food. Mexican food is considerably lighter than its Tex counterparts and makes the best use of the fresh ingredients that Mexico is rolling in. They use tortilla wraps, yes, but the fillings are fresh rather than greasy and are often filled without a scrap of meat. I’ve never been to Mexico but Thomasina paints such a fantastic picture with her books and TV series of the country that I feel like I have.

From this book I made spinach and feta tacos and a homemade roast tomato salsa. You know you’re getting old when you look forward to coming home and eating spinach and feta, no sane child or teenager that I know would see this as an acceptable meal. Up until a couple of years ago I would have completely agreed, but judging by this dinner and how much I was looking forward to it, I have now matured, much like a blue cheese or a fine wine. It’s official, I’m old. The roast tomato salsa is made by chucking tomatoes, onions, chilli and garlic in a hot, dry saucepan and cooking until soft and ‘charred’. Basically, you need to burn your food. I was hesitant about this but Thomasina won Masterchef so clearly she knows better than me. I obediently burnt the ingredients and then blitzed then in my mini food processor (best £16 spent, by the way. I’ve made countless curry pastes, dips, hummus and now a salsa and wouldn’t be without it in the kitchen). Despite my reservations it tasted amazing, smoky from all that burning but still spicy, sweet and with a strong taste of roasted garlic. Thomasina recommends pairing the tacos with this salsa and she certainly knows what she’s talking about. The tacos themselves were more like sweetcorn and feta than spinach as after wilting in a hot pan then adding to the sweetcorn mixture the spinach had practically disappeared. I love spinach but its tendency to drastically reduce in size once cooked really ticks me off. I want more of the food I love, not less of it. Still, when served in corn tortillas and topped off with smoky salsa and crumbly feta you barely notice the spinach as there’s so much more going on. I’m not sure just how healthy they are, but with all the vegetables contained within the tortillas, no meat and only cooked in a small amount of oil, they surely can’t be bad for you. While I could never be a vegetarian for any longer than a day before I caved in to a bacon sandwich over here, I imagine living meat free wouldn’t be so much of a chore in Mexico. With chillies, corn, tomatoes, mangoes, pineapples, bananas and citrus fruits growing in abundance over there, as well as being a huge producer of cocoa beans, sugar cane and coffee, I think somehow I’d survive on a meat free diet. Although they do appreciate the humble pig in much the same way us Brits do, so perhaps bacon sandwiches or pulled pork tacos would get the better of me at some point anyway. Ah well, there are some things in life that are just too good to give up.

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Posted by on June 30, 2013 in American, Books, Cooking, Food, Mexican

 

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Dusting Off The Red Wine

Now that the Great Baking Binge of May 2013 has come to pass without severe weight gain or artery blockage, its time to get back into cooking some savoury meals that don’t need blocks of butter and sackfuls of sugar. More’s the pity. This week I made use of Lisa Faulkner’s book Recipes From My Mother To My Daughter, which was a housewarming present from my lovely auntie. I really warmed to Lisa when she was competing on Celebrity Masterchef a couple of years ago; she seemed so sweet, likeable and performed pretty well under extreme pressure. Her food always looked like something I’d order in a restaurant and managed to avoid the ridiculous pretentiousness and clichés of some Michelin starred food. Keep it simple people. In short, she came across as a fantastic home cook. I love the title of the cookbook and the whole concept of passing recipes down through different generations. While I’ve inherited a cracking chilli recipe from my dad and am always being given recipes from my auntie, I wish I had some recipes from my mum that had been passed along to me. I have really strong memories of baking bread rolls with my mum when I was young, ‘helping’ her make cake batter in the food processor (by help I mean taking a spoon to the mix and shovelling it into my mouth….some things don’t change) and watching her decorate homemade birthday cakes, the best one being covered in green icing made to look like grass with plastic cows scattered on top. It’s clear where I’ve inherited my baking gene, but it would be amazing to have a battered notebook or pile of recipe cards in my mums writing to draw on in times of foodie need. Hopefully when I have a family of my own I’ll be a good enough home cook that my own children will want to cook the same recipes when they grow up. Better keep on practicing then. Lisa’s mother died when she was young too and her and her sister took on the role of cooking for the family using their mothers recipes which they grew up eating, and which feature heavily in this cookbook.

Feeling in need of some comforting food, I gave beef bourguignon my very first go. As you may know, I’ve grown fairly fond of French food yet have never tried this classic of the region. I know, as if I dared to call myself a fan of French food. Being the unsophisticated oaf that I am, I don’t drink red wine (again, the nerve of me calling myself a French food fan) but we had some bottles gathering dust in the kitchen. It wasn’t that they’d been there long, they were housewarming gifts, but everything in this house ends up covered in dust if left lying around for longer than 5 minutes. Just ask the cat. Beef bourguignon is traditionally made with burgundy wine, of which I had none. Faced with a choice between a French or a Spanish wine, I thought it would be best to stick with French, although being so clueless about wine I wouldn’t have put it past me to completely disrespect the French by chucking in a Spanish red wine. Gerard Depardieu would be furious. Anyway, the dish takes about three hours to cook in the oven after a little bit of stirring on the hob, and I served it with mashed sweet potato. The beef was meltingly tender from the slow cooking and the wine sauce had thickened into a luscious, velvety, rich sauce. I’m not normally a huge fan of mushrooms served whole but the button ‘shrooms had a pleasing texture and had absorbed a lot of the boozy sauce. It all went really well with the sweet potatoes and despite the fact I hate red wine, cooked down in a stew I completely forgot my dislike of the stuff. Annoyingly I chose to cook this recipe on the one hot day of the week so it felt slightly unnatural to be eating a wintry stew while the sun was shining outside. Ironic too as the rest of the week has been pretty dire weather wise and the beef would have gone down an absolute treat. Still, it tasted mighty fine and is another great staple to help me on my way to home cooked perfection. For tasty home cooked food as well as some more adventurous dishes for the brave amongst you, you can’t go wrong with this gem of a book.

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2013 in Books, Cooking, Food, French

 

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Chineasy Chicken

The best Chinese chicken I’ve ever had came tucked in a baguette from a sandwich shop just round the corner from the furniture shop I used to work at as a teenager. Every Saturday without fail I’d take all the staffs orders, nip down to the bakery and grab our huge order, and my order would always be Chinese chicken baguette. It was so tasty and the baguettes were always the perfect combination of crunchy crust and soft, doughy interior. Teenage lunch heaven. So you can imagine my grief and heartbreak when they took the Chinese chicken off the menu one sorry, sorry day in the early noughties. Distraught I was! I had to downgrade to a chicken tikka filling which while still being tasty, was not a patch on the Chinese. What does this have to do with today’s blog? Well, nothing really to be honest, except that today’s dinner reminded me of this early experience of grief and betrayal, and I got to use a pun in today’s title from one of my favourite movies ever, Ratatouille (the plot of which can be easily summed up with ‘there’s a rat in me kitchen, what am I gonna do?’. Get it to cook you a Michelin starred meal, that’s what).
Tonight I went with Gordon Ramsays’ newest book Ultimate Cookery Course and made Sichuan chicken. As the title suggests, it’s Chinese and its really easy, all you need to do is marinate the chicken then cook it in the marinade with chilli, garlic and ginger until the chicken is cooked and is covered in the reduced, sticky marinade. The marinade contains one of my favourite ingredients to say, which is Shaoxing rice wine, and really tickles me every time I say it. Don’t ask why because I don’t know, I just like the way it sounds. Try it then maybe you’ll understand. This is definitely a recipe which is better when used with chicken thighs, they don’t dry out in the same way breasts do and have a lot more flavour. Plus, if you’re on a budget they are so much cheaper, although I’d go with them over breasts even if they were more expensive. It can take time to reduce a sauce so you don’t want the meat to dry out and become barely inedible, so if you’ve not done so before, give thighs a go in a curry or casserole to see the difference. I served the chicken with some straight to wok noodles in Singapore flavour (I know what you’re thinking, how mental am I serving Sichaun and Singapore cuisine on the same plate? It’s risk taking like that that’ll get you noticed in culinary circles) which I had to hand and meant less washing up for the other half. The result? The glaze wasn’t as sticky and thick as I’d have liked it, but it had a nice spicy ping to it and coated the chicken really well. It did taste a bit too strongly of sesame oil which Gordon advised me to drizzle over the finished dish so perhaps I was a but heavy handed in the oil department but the flavour of the marinade and chillies fought there way through it. But enough about my opinion, I know you all really want to know what The Boyfriend thought about it, my toughest critic. I think it’s safe to say food critics A.A Gill, Jay Rayner and Kate Spicer can rest easy tonight, as when asked for his review his thoughts on dinner were, word for word, “I liked it, 3 out of 5. A perfectly acceptable midweek meal”. If he were to be paid by the word he’d soon find himself bankrupt, sleeping on the street and offering sexual favours for a sandwich. But I’ll say this, at least he’s concise, no waffly preamble about something completely unrelated to dinner before spending all of 3 sentences on the entire point of the article. Something to comfort him while he’s on the park bench and Gill is in his trendy London home.

So we had a successful dinner tonight, nothing groundbreaking but tasty, filling and involving very little effort and minimal washing up. Plus it was a lot healthier than a takeaway, although nowhere near as satisfying after a long day. You’ll notice that once again my presentation is less than impressive, Monica Galletti would tear me apart were I to present her with such a plate, but I’d rather a hot dinner that looked a little shabby than a good looking dinner that was lukewarm after all the faffing. Saying all that, I do love how she can destroy a chef with just a grimace and a stare on Masterchef, more uncomfortable to watch than a Bush Tucker Trial.

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Posted by on November 21, 2012 in Chicken, Chinese, Cooking, Food

 

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Lamb Dhansak In Its Rice Anorak

If the title of todays bloggage means nought to you, then may I point you in the direction of the sublimely bizarre Mighty Boosh DVD box sets and hopefully all will become clear. Perhaps, either that or you’ll come away from the experience more confused than ever, who can say, it’s that kind of show? In essence though, I just pinched one of their lines as it perfectly suited what I’ve cooked the week, which obviously was a lamb dhansak. It’s always infuriated me that I’ve never managed to cook a decent Indian curry, heaven knows I’ve tried but they always end up watery, or tasteless, or tasting purely of tinned tomatoes. I know a homemade curry is never going to taste anything like a curry from the local Indian takeaway, but all I ask is that it tastes nice. Well reader, on Saturday I finally made some progress. Get out the champers and party poppers. I’ve tried curries from so many different cookbooks, all have failed, so it came as quite a surprise to me that the recipe that finally worked was from a recipe book for pies. Yes that’s right, not a curry book but a pie book. It’s like up is down and down is up. The reason for there being a curry in Pieminister is that you make the curry one day and dish up some as a regular curry with rice, and then the next day pop the remaining curry into pie, bake and serve. Genius. The recipe is called The Guru, I’m not sure why but recycling the curry into a pie seemed like a great idea to me. Plus the flavour in a curry intensifies when left for a day and reheated so in theory the pie should taste even better than your dinner the night before.
First things first, this recipe yields an absolute truckload of food so if you’re feeding a lot of people this is the dish to go for. We had enough for 2 servings of curry, 4 slices of pie and at least 2 servings for the freezer, but we have big appetites so less greedy people could probably stretch it further. It’s also packed full of healthy ingredients, but don’t let this put you off! Aside from the lamb, you’ve got chickpeas, lentils, onions, sweet potato, tomatoes, spinach and loads of spices so plenty of super foods which add flavour and texture, as well as added smugness which comes with the knowledge that actually the curry is really quite good for you. Pieminister also taught me that the way to avoid the tinned tomato taste is to use a jar of passata instead of the usual tinned stuff. There’s no metallic taste and its thicker so the curry ends up far less watery, two perils that until now I’d never been able to avoid. Such an obvious substitution to make but one I’d ever thought of and I urge you to give it a go too if you’re just as hopeless as me at Indian curries. In the end, the dhansak tasted pretty good. Nothing amazing, but pretty good nonetheless. It even looked like a proper curry, and had a decent amount of spice in it. Even The Boyfriend thought it was pretty good and he is my toughest critic. In the pie though, it was less impressive. I say that, but the curry was still tasty and definitely had developed more of a kick overnight. It was the pastry that let it down, that bloody shortcrust pastry. I’m just not a fan, it’s bland and dull and adds nothing to the dish, I should have just had the dhansak with rice again. The Boyfriend went so far as to say that shortcrust makes him feel sick, so it’s fair to say I won’t be making shortcrust pastry in my kitchen again. Puff pastry is the way forward. To accompany the pie I made Bombay roasted new potatoes from Jamie’s Britain which thankfully got the thumbs up, and some petit pois peas which always taste good.

Feeling adventurous last night I also decided to whip up a dessert, vanilla soufflé with a raspberry coulis (what normal people call a sauce, however the recipe did come from my Masterchef cookbook so one can expect a little bit of pretension). Putting it in the oven I was convinced that the soufflé would be a disaster as the two components of the pud would not gel together in my mixing bowl, but I was wrong in my conviction as they rose splendidly and came out just as I wanted them to. The soufflés tasted perfectly of vanilla, which is reassuring considering vanilla pods aren’t cheap, and the smell of the milk infusing with the vanilla was amazing. Vanilla is easily my favourite smell of all time, it’s gorgeous. It was light, fluffy and reminded me of a just cooked pancake, albeit with a strong dose of vanilla instead of the traditional sugar and lemon. The coulis was also very good, sharp but sweet and added some punchiness to the soft, fluffy soufflé. My only beef with soufflés is that while they taste lovely, it’s like eating air and doesn’t give me something to sink my teeth into and therefore leaves me feeling somewhat deflated, much like a failed soufflé. In my eyes, the perfect desserts are either fudgey, gooey, chocolatey concoctions, fruity pies or crumbles with lashings of custard, or a tub of Ben and Jerry’s. With this up against it, it’s no wonder the soufflé didn’t entirely hit the spot, tasty though it was.

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A touch of Masterchef… well, sort of

Time today for a much neglected cookbook to be put to work, and also for some actual cooking to take place in my very neglected kitchen. My pots and pans will be pleased to know I’m getting back in the kitchen like a 1950s housewife whose husband works faaaar too late. The cookbook in question is the Masterchef cookbook which, as a big fan of the show and it’s hosts, seemed only right to buy so that I could turn into the next big Masterchef winner wowing John and Gregg. Well, as it turned out I looked at all the pretty pictures and then had a peek at the ingredients and instructions and got rather intimidated. This book isn’t for beginners, and even for someone comfortable in the kitchen spatchcocking a chicken or proving some fresh bread, it can be a little overwhelming. This isn’t a criticism of the book at all, I watch Masterchef religiously, know what’s involved and that the recipes are complex and difficult, but seeing it all in print makes it very clear how much effort the contestants put in. Just in case seeing them getting shouted at by professional chefs and sweating in a Thai kitchen didn’t give it away! But if the Olympic athletes have taught me anything, its that if you want to be the best, you’ve got to push yourself and make life a little harder, so on Sunday I finally gave the book a go and cooked a lovely little meal for The Boyfriend, making the starter from this book. I chose crispy lime and ginger prawns which admittedly is one of the easier recipes from the book but every Masterchef has to start somewhere! Word of warning about prawns by the way. I love them, but since learning about deveining prawns, I’m much more picky about them. Next time you’re about to eat a king prawn, take a look for the black line running down its back. Word up, that’s its digestive tract, so essentially that is prawn faeces. Get a knife, run it down the back of the prawn and remove it,because while it’s probably harmless, you really don’t want to eat that shit. I’m not sure all restaurants remove it as it is quite fiddly work, but now I know what that black line is I won’t touch a non deveined one. So now you know, sorry if I’ve ruined prawns for you, but an educated foodie is one that doesn’t eat crap.
My (deveined) prawns were marinated in some lime juice and spice then coated in flour, egg and breadcrumbs flavoured with lime zest and coriander. Smelt amazing. Then I fried them in hot oil until crispy and dished up with some sweet chilli dipping sauce. They were full of zingy Thai tastes, with a little bit of crunch, although I did mess the coating up by coating the prawns all in one go rather than doing them one at a time. The crunchy coating clumped up and a lot was left in the frying pan. The difference that taking a bit more time would have made shows the huge gap between a home cook and a Masterchef, a lesson I have definitely learnt from and will improve upon next time. And there will be a next time, because they were gorgeous even with a clumpy coating, and The Boyfriend is obsessed with prawns in pretty much any guise. Plus, what can I say about the beauty of sweet chilli dipping sauce that hasn’t already been said by a million dippers around the world?

Last night I also cooked Cypriot stuffed chicken from Jamie Oliver’s (can’t be cooked in) 30 Minute Meals. This was also very yummy, with moist chicken and a tangy stuffing made from herbs, sun dried tomatoes and feta. I served it with The Boyfriends legendary dauphinoise potatoes and some asparagus and tomatoes, which with the exception of the tomatoes which I don’t particularly care for, was lovely. While not perfect (not sure how well sharp sun dried tomatoes and feta really go with creamy dauphinoise) it was still very pleasing and didn’t leave either of us feeling bloated, heavy or guilty. While altogether the meal wasn’t too fiddly or time consuming, it does use quite a lot of kitchen utensils. Not a problem for me as the highlight of spending time cooking a good meal means I don’t have to wash up. Suddenly my passion for cooking becomes a lot clearer to those puzzled by my enthusiasm! My mission to become an amazing cook continues, I will try to push myself a bit more in the kitchen and not always take the easy route. I predict a few disasters, but just because you stumble, doesn’t mean you have to fall. Blame London 2012 for all these motivational cliches.

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Posted by on August 13, 2012 in Books, Chicken, Cooking, Food, French, Thai

 

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Lasagna, Key Lime and Masterchef

Someone please slap me. It has become increasingly obvious to me that since the boyfriend flew off to more exotic climes to work, I have turned into a big soppy ball of mush. It’s vomit inducing even for me, I need a good slap to knock some sense into me (although if you see me in the next couple of days, please don’t). Driving to work listening to the new Mary J Blige album (which is very good by the way), I was paying extra special attention to the lyrics and wondering when exactly I’d spoken to MJB about my love life and why she’d cruelly decided to turn it into a song for millions to hear? Thanks a lot Mary! But now any song which remotely mentions love has me going ” Oh my  god, this is EXACTLY how I feel, this song is about ME!”, and if it also happens to mention being separated by distance and/or time then I start wondering exactly when Alicia Keys started reading my mind and why I’ve not yet received any royalties. Its a sad state of affairs, I may have to take drastic action and start listening to heavy metal to remove me from this lovesick state. Cooking at least takes my mind off it, and I’ve taken another two recipes off the challenge list in the last couple of days. Not that this really puts a dent in the list, as I know already that come payday next week I’ll be adding another cookbook to the list. Like I said, its a sickness and I don’t want to get better.

I had a few work friends round for dinner last night, and decided that instead of playing it safe with the usual lasagne then chocolate cake combo (wonderful though it is) I’d cook a more unusual take on lasagne. This one was from the May 2010 issue of Delicious magazine which is dedicated to Italian food and the recipe was mushroom, parma ham and mascarpone lasagne, which also had pork mince in it. Well I must say it was very nice, and a decent change from traditional lasagne. The meat and mushrooms were cooked in a white wine and chicken  stock sauce with lots of parsley, garlic and onion, and the mascarpone béchamel sauce was really creamy and complimented the meat. Feedback was also very positive and empty plates are always a good sign. I forgot to take a photo of it though, but if you want to picture it, just imagine a lasagne with a white filling as opposed to the usual red one. Thats it!

Dessert was then chocolate and key lime pie from Nigella Kitchen, which is another great cookbook from Nigella. I’d like to point out that there is absolutely nothing nutritional about this dessert apart form the lime juice, which lets face it once mixed with double cream and evaporated milk, then placed into a pie crust made up of butter, digestive biscuits, cocoa powder and choc chips, has lost all of its citrussy goodness. But if you eat dessert for its nutritional qualities, then what the hell are you eating for junk food??? The lime stands up to all the other ingredients though and the filling tastes really zingy and is also super smooth and delicious. The pie crust, while nice did not set very well and ended up crumbling everywhere and became rubble next to the filling. Three slices are still sitting in the fridge and I just know I am going to cave in soon and grab one. It would be rude not to.

And on that note I’m going to eat some leftover lasagne, and catch up on this weeks Masterchef finals. I’m pretty certain that with these heightened emotions and the manipulative use of emotional music I will be crying my eyes out when they surely crown Shalina the winner. Masterchef gets me every time, better take my make up off first!

 
 

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Mexican Food Made Simple – All things cheese!

Todays cooking challenge comes from the book Mexican Food Made Simple by Thomasina Miers. This lady won Masterchef a few years ago and with both this cookbook and the restaurants she runs, she’s opened many peoples eyes to the fact that Mexican food isn’t all melted cheese and tacos. I’m not doing much to dispel this myth by cooking 2 recipes with a lot of cheese in them, but take my word for it, authentic Mexican food is a world away from the Tex-Mex you see everywhere! I brought this book after eating at Thomasinas restaurant Wahaca in Covent Garden, and the food was so good I knew the cookbook had to be mine. Having won Masterchef she could easily have gone down the route of pretentious, overpriced quenelles and confits, but instead she chose to champion Mexican tapas at reasonable prices, and for that I am very thankful. The salsa is light, zingy and fresh, as is the ceviche salad, and everything tastes wonderful, ranging from spicy, smoky, sour and sweet. And the margaritas mean serious business! Go there and experience a taste sensation, and some lightheadedness from the cocktails.

The first recipe I cooked were cheese and ham empanadas, which was to be found in the chapter ‘Cheesy Things’. Now I don’t know about you, but I truly believe the world would be a much happier place if every cookbook had a chapter called ‘Cheesy Things’. Surely if everyone was too busy cooking and eating cheesy things there would be peace and harmony across the land, you can’t be angry or sad when eating cheese especially if it’s melted. Or am I just overstating the importance of cheese? Empanadas by the way, are little puff pastry parcels filled with a spicy cheese and ham filling. I can confirm that they taste even better than they sound. They were just absolutely delicious, and as a hangover cure they are pretty unbeatable. Some of them did explode in the oven, leaving a gooey cheesy mess all over the baking tray, but the ones that remained intact looked so cute and dinky it was almost a shame to eat them. Almost. I urge you to make the empanadas, they are scrummy and the best thing I’ve cooked so far in this challenge. You need the recipe in your life!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second thing I cooked was vanilla cheesecake from the same cookbook. If you’ve read my earlier blog entry about chicken fettucine, you’ll know that I am big fan of cheesecakes, particularly banana cream cheesecake from the Cheesecake Factory. This cheesecake was a little different and I must say I was a bit disappointed. I have a very fixed idea of what a cheesecake should be like, and while this one looked like a traditional cheesecake it really didn’t taste like one. The recipe called for 6 eggs, separated, and upon eating it became clear that this many eggs made it less cheesecake, more custard tart. Now I have absolutely nothing against custard tart, but when you’ve been expecting dense, cheesy cheesecake, a light and fluffy eggy tasting cake is a massive letdown. Thomasina does say that Mexican cheesecake is very different to normal cheesecake, but it really should have been called custard cake instead. It’s a real shame as there was a lot of cream cheese in there, and its a big bulky thing so needs to be eaten. I think this will be taken into work tomorrow to get other peoples opinions, but I will be upfront and say ‘expect custard’, I don’t want to lead them on! Ironically, while we were being disappointed by the custard cake, our friends in America posted a photo on Facebook of the best cheesecake in the world at The Factory which they were tucking in to. Thereby dooming this custard cake forever in our minds. The audacity!

 

The cookbook itself is great, the cheesecake is the only dud I’ve cooked from it, and if you want to see what real Mexican food is like then I highly recommend this book. While you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, the cover on this sums up the vibrancy and playfulness of the food on its pages and it also looks gorgeous. Or if you can’t be assed to cook Mexican food, get yourself down to Wahaca in London and give your tastebuds a workout!

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on February 26, 2012 in Baking, Books, Cooking

 

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